Stunning timelapse video captured from the ISS shows a Russian rocket blasting to space


Stunning timelapse video shows a Russian rocket blasting off from Earth, as seen from aboard the International Space Station

  • ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst captured footage from the ISS of Soyuz MS-11 launch blasting off this week
  • Russian rocket was carrying astronauts Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques and Oleg Kononenko to the ISS
  • The launch was pushed to an earlier date after Russia’s October attempt failed, forcing astronauts to abort 

A breathtaking timelapse video captured by an astronaut on the International Space Station has revealed the moment a Soyuz rocket breaks through the clouds toward the darkness of space.

The incredible footage was filmed by ESA’s Alexander Gerst earlier this week, when Soyuz MS-11 launched carrying astronauts Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques and Oleg Kononenko to the ISS.

In the video, the rocket appears just a white streak snaking through the sky over Earth, before briefly lighting up in a bright bulb as the crewed spacecraft continues on its way to the orbiting lab.  

Scroll down for video 

Soyuz MS-11 launched on December 3, a few weeks earlier than originally planned. The mission was advanced after Russia’s October launch failed, forcing astronauts to abort.

This time around, all went according to plan.

‘Our friends, on the way here,’ Gerst captioned the video. ‘The essence of spaceflight, in a timelapse showing the Soyuz MS-11 launch.

‘I still can’t comprehend that there are humans riding on the top of this lone white streak into the great black open.’

The new crew members successfully docked to the ISS and were on board later that day, when the space station was flying over the southern coast of Yemen.

A breathtaking timelapse video captured by an astronaut on the International Space Station has revealed the moment a Soyuz rocket breaks through the clouds toward the darkness of space. The rocket appears just a white streak snaking through the sky over Earth, before briefly lighting up in a bright bulb as the crewed spacecraft continues on its way to the orbiting lab

It took less than nine minutes for the craft to enter a designated orbit after launch, before docking to the ISS six hours later.

In the time between, the craft orbited Earth four times.

Gerst has previously shared videos and images he’s captured while working on the orbiting laboratory.

Last month, he shared another rocket launch timelapse video, that time capturing a Soyuz over the night sky.

Lift-off happened at 6.31 ET December 3 (11.31 GMT) from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, and replaced an earlier mission which failed in October after the rocket malfunctioned

Lift-off happened at 6.31 ET December 3 (11.31 GMT) from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, and replaced an earlier mission which failed in October after the rocket malfunctioned

WHAT IS THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION?

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $100 billion (£80 billion) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 250 miles (400 km) above Earth.

It has been permanently staffed by rotating crews of astronauts and cosmonauts since November 2000. 

Research conducted aboard the ISS often requires one or more of the unusual conditions present in low Earth orbit, such as low-gravity or oxygen.

The International Space Station (file photo) is a $100 billion (£80 billion) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 250 miles (400 km) above Earth

The International Space Station (file photo) is a $100 billion (£80 billion) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 250 miles (400 km) above Earth

ISS studies have investigated human research, space medicine, life sciences, physical sciences, astronomy and meteorology.

The US space agency, Nasa, spends about $3 billion (£2.4 billion) a year on the space station program, a level of funding that is endorsed by the Trump administration and Congress.

A U.S. House of Representatives committee that oversees Nasa has begun looking at whether to extend the program beyond 2024.

Alternatively the money could be used to speed up planned human space initiatives to the moon and Mars.

And this past summer, the astronaut shared a stunning look at Earth swathed in clouds, with barely a hint of blue peeking through the cracks.

Through the window, the curved horizon of our planet is seen in clear view – along with a few gadgets attached to the space station itself.

The astronaut shared the image on Twitter this past Saturday, writing simply: ‘Wolkenplanet – A planet of clouds.’

Gerst is currently leading the Horizons mission on the ISS, in his second stint at the orbiting lab.

 

  

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